#Kauai – Things I See on My Walks

Daily walks are a fact of life following our recent trip to Japan—I never want to be so out  of shape in another country again. To keep it fairly mudless, I decided to walk sections of Ke Ala Hele Makalae (The Path that Goes by the Coast) from Kapa‘a to Kealia to Paliku Beach, also known as Donkeys Beach. The one-way distance from Kapa‘a Community Center to the north end of the path is about 3.4 miles, and Kealia Beach is a nice midway turnaround.

Sunrise, April 17, 2017, Kapaa

Sunrise at Kapa’a Community Center

So, over the past month I’ve walked at least one hour each day at 3–3.5 mph (5–5.5 kmh) while observing tide changes as well as familiar and unfamiliar scenery along the way. When conditions are just perfect following a good rain one can see Wai‘ale‘ale and Makaleha Falls from the north end of town; on days like this, you just know that they’re out there.

Manicured Hedge & Makaleha Mountains

Manicured hedge & Makaleha mountains from Kapa’a

Just over that hedge is the north end of the Kauai Products Fair, a kitschy little tourist trap. The path overlays the roadbed of the former Ahukini Terminal & Railway company right of way, and thus features many of the elements one might expect to see on a train ride. Below is a shot taken within the cut at the summit between Kapa’a town and Kealia. I took this shot not only to reveal the striations in the soil but the various wildflowers growing along the top and left face of the cut. The fence in the foreground is to catch falling rocks—a recurrent hazard along the path.

Creeping Vegetation and Slide Fence

Creeping Vegetation and Slide Fence

Just beyond the crest, the landscape and flora change rapidly. Here, overlooking the mouth of Kapa‘a Stream are plants that look like they were plucked from the Sonoran Desert. They are growing out of inhospitable rocks, but as the soil improves downslope, they give way to the usual and customary specimens.

South Kealia Beach

Looking down to Kealia Beach from the Little Cut

One morning I was fortunate enough to glimpse Makaleha Falls, looking west at the intersection of Mailihuna Rd and Kuhio Highway (56) near the mouth of Kapa‘a Stream. That photo bomber at left center was a Nene, the indigenous goose, I believe.

Makaleha from Kealia

Makaleha Falls from Kealia

Typically, at low tide the scene from the north end of the bridge, looking south, resembles the one at left. For the first time since we moved here I caught the windless shot at right. The old railroad cut is evident in the background and clearly illustrates the effect of the prevailing wind on plants along the coast.

I often park at Kealia Beach because it expands my options for going north or south, or a little of both if it suits me, and that variety helps keep the walks interesting. Other days, I walk up from the house, and down Mailihuna Rd and cross Kuhio Highway at the north end of Kealia Beach, then head back to town, and home via Kawaihau Rd. Below, the Kealia Lifeguard Station, as seen through the windshield from the parking lot.

Lifeguard Station

Lifeguard station at Kealia Beach

Proceeding north out of Kealia, both wind and ocean, deafening at times, are constant companions.This shot was taken about halfway between Kealia and the Pineapple Dump.

Pathway north of Kealia Beach

Beyond the 2.0 mile mark, north of Kealia Beach

Next stop: the Pineapple Dump. Once upon a time, the sugar trains were idled only on Sundays, and an engine and side dump cars were made available to the cannery at Kapa‘a. Pineapple tops were hauled out onto the little pier, tipped and emptied into the ocean to be carried far away. Sometimes the tides and wind were not so favorable and the tailings were slammed back into town along the beach, and the smell was… awful, so I’m told.

Pineapple Dump at the Horizon

Pineapple Dump at the horizon

Looking back on the Pineapple Dump, and on the way to Donkeys Beach. Again, the direction of the prevailing winds is easily distinguished by the habit of the trees and shrubs hugging the coast.

Pineapple Dump from the North

Farewell to the Pineapple Dump: going north

Stopping to study another planet, or so it seems from the random distribution of stones on all but lifeless red dirt.

Red Scabland - Like Craters of Mars

Red scabland – like craters on Mars

Further along, I encountered what looks like a nursery for table rocks. Yes, if you have a state or national park and are seeking table rocks for your collection, this may be where they’re born and raised.

Tropic Table Rocks

Tropic table rocks

“Reindeer Slug,” the first thing that came to mind when I looked up and saw this old snag lying on the ground. We do have some pretty big slugs and snails here.

Whitenend Fallen Tree by the sea

Reindeer Slug

Even weeds are special here. I cannot identify them all, but enjoy them nonetheless. Three or four varieties of morning glories thrive on and off the path, some low ground cover that looks rather more glacial than tropical, and here and there so hardy bright yellow flowers.

There you have it then, 3.4 miles in what, 20 minutes? You’re fast! There are many more plants, people, and other animals to see along the path, but my objective was to cover a considerable distance as quickly as possible, exercise that is, so whether you live here, or you’re just visiting, take a hike; have a look.

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5 thoughts on “#Kauai – Things I See on My Walks

    • Brett says:

      Yes, we do live in Hawaii, but I grew up in a place that I had to drive hours for a walk in the mountains. On any sunny Monday in Spring, I’d get that fever (phone booth flu), call in sick and spend the day up on Skyline Drive, maybe hike a piece of the A/T off Blue Ridge Parkway, and not feel guilty in the least.

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  1. Hawaii Planner says:

    Gorgeous photos! I love it. It makes me feel like I was enjoying Kauai as well. 🙂 When we are in Maui, we walk every morning at sunrise (it helps that we are there for a short period & just never adjust to the time zones :))). It’s always stunning.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Laurel says:

    Your walk has some wonderful views indeed! We also walk about 3 to 3.5 miles, but with vastly different views. Rural roads, a horse farm, a river, and a small neighborhood where the trees and bushes are blooming like crazy right now in the Midwest spring. It’s familiar, but we have been setting out in different directions lately just for a change up. It’s hard to keep motivated some days, but we’re retired, too, and it’s necessary to stay in shape for the travels and hiking we like to do. Keep up the good work!

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    • Brett says:

      Mahalo! I remember such walks in the mid-Atlantic Region spring. So far the weather has been most cooperative. Even the sunrise shot was serendipitous — 10 minutes late because the sky had been solid as oak all night long.

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